\Sacred Universe/

morg-ana:

ohmymckirk:

so-um-yeah:

aloistrancyhive:

breathe-squeeze-follow-through:

26 Male Survivors Of Sexual Assault Quoting The People Who Attacked Them

http://www.buzzfeed.com/spenceralthouse/male-survivors-of-sexual-assault-quoting-the-people-who-a

This needs more notes.

no one seems to care if they are guys 

reminder that rape and sexual abuse happens to everyone, not just girls

reminder that rape and sexual abuse needs to be acknowledged no matter a person’s gender and “no one seems to care if they are guys” is a typical antifeminist theory that is disproven by the fact that this photo set has 100,000+ notes alone

gracehelbig:

If you haven’t subscribed to my brother yet you’re dumb.

BALLS

I LIKE BALLS

antirecords:

Words and music by Keaton Henson. Acclaimed actor Sir Derek Jacobi and film maker William Williamson.

antirecords:

Broken Twin performing “Sun Has Gone.”

beautiful

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Area 1983 - 1987.  A look back at Area, the ’80s club that turned partying into an art.

"It was more important that we make our mark than make it rich," says Eric Goode, one of the four founders of the legendary nightclub Area, which was only open from 1983 to 1987, but managed to be more influential and memorable than Studio 54. And those memories — of over-the-top art installations, decadent after-hours antics and the famous and fabulous — are all collected by Eric and his sister Jennifer, Area’s art director, in the thick, oversize tome Area, published this month by Abrams. 

Every six weeks or so, Area (which Goode started with his brother Christopher and childhood friends Shawn Hausman and Darius Azari) completely transformed itself. Themes like “Religion,” “Elements,” “Confinement,” “Sex,” “Future,” “Fashion,” “Art” and “Suburbia” went way beyond even the craziest of Halloween party décor, reimagining the 33,000 square foot space into a 3D multisensory mind trip. For the “Food” motif, Area’s pool became a giant bowl of alphabet soup. “Gnarly” had a skate ramp with skateboarders gliding by the dance floor. “Religion” included a 10-foot burning cross and a confessional booth complete with a “priest.”

If you were lucky enough to get plucked from the manic and overdressed crowd flooding the club’s entrance on Hudson Street, the first thing you saw once inside was a hall of dioramas showcasing Area’s house performers in costumes. It was like the American Museum of Freaked-out History. Gender-bender Bernard-Zette would be posed in the lounge on any given night as Jesus Christ, Jim Jones, St. Sebastian, Brooke Shields, Anne Frank or Jane Jetson, to name a few. Inside the club, there was an enormous aquarium with live sharks, and a coed bathroom that soon became a VIP room without a velvet rope or guest list. 

here and here

The Films of Stanley Kubrick.

A Clockwork Orange, 1970-71.

Lolita, 1960-62.

Barry Lyndon, 1973-75.

Full Metal Jacket, 1987.

Full Metal Jacket, 1987.

2001: A Space Odyssey, 1965-68.

Stanley Kubrick, Director, on the set of Paths of Glory, 1957.

Stanley Kubrick, Director, during the filming 2001: A Space Odyssey, 1965-68.

nba:

Carmelo Anthony of the New York Knicks reacts in the final seconds of their 95-91 win over the Atlanta Hawks at Philips Arena on November 13, 2013 in Atlanta, Georgia.
(Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)

nba:

Carmelo Anthony of the New York Knicks reacts in the final seconds of their 95-91 win over the Atlanta Hawks at Philips Arena on November 13, 2013 in Atlanta, Georgia.

(Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)

antirecords:

Iggy Pop, Tom Waits, Patti Smith and band - circa 1976.

antirecords:

Iggy Pop, Tom Waits, Patti Smith and band - circa 1976.